Things to do

in and around Port Erin

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Things to do 2017-03-28T15:05:15+00:00

ACTIVITIES

Things to do

Whether you are looking for a relaxed and friendly retreat, in luxurious modern accommodation with fantastic sea views, then The Arches is for you. There are good walks directly from the house as it is located on the coastal path. And plenty more to do; click on the tabs below for details…

We have a number of pubs selling local ales. The Bay pub (our favourite) has its own Bushy’s bitter locally brewed by the owner. It is a great place in summer to sit outside or in winter by the coal fires.
walkingThe Arches is a great base from which to explore both the coast and the inland secret by ways of this ancient landscape. Have a look at what Go-Mann Adventures has to offer if you’d like to join a guided walk or request your own bespoke service.

Bradda Head café has beautiful views and is great for a lunchtime treat or a cup of tea or coffee with home made cake and biscuits.

There is a lovely little café on the beach called the Cosy Nook, which offers good home cooked food, an an unrivalled open air dining experience right on the beach. The Nook is open from Easter and closes after Port Erin’s famous bonfire night celebrations.

There are take away Chinese, pizza and a fish and chip shop (the latter being the best on the island some say!) In Port St Mary (just a couple of minutes down the road from Port Erin) we have a good Indian restaurant. And the Harbour Lights restaurant is well known for its dishes making the best of local fish and produce.

Both road and mountain biking is a delight with suggested and designated routes all available from where we live at all levels of difficulty.
Basking Shark from guest terraceThe nine metre tidal range and remoteness from the pollution of adjacent islands gives the island a superb diving itinerary for the adventurous. Resident populations of common and grey seals enliven many a dive with their curious young, whilst migratory basking sharks are a common sight in the early summer. The second largest fish in nature’s kingdom, they cannot fail to impress the respectful diver. Wrecks abound, reflecting the island’s maritime history. There are some extremely competent and well equipped operations locally.
The Rowany Golf course is within walking distance, and can be seen just beyond the field where the cows that supply our milk graze. The nearby Castletown Golf course is highly respected as a challenging and enjoyable experience by expert sportsmen from around the world.
We have pubs serving a variety of hearty fare. There is the Café Delicious on the front, an ice cream parlour and many other places.

Bradda Head café has beautiful views and is great for a lunchtime treat or a cup of tea or coffee with home made cake and biscuits.

There is a lovely little café on the beach called the Cosy Nook, which offers good home cooked food, an an unrivalled open air dining experience right on the beach. The Nook is open from Easter and closes after Port Erin’s famous bonfire night celebrations.

There are take away Chinese, pizza and a fish and chip shop (the latter being the best on the island some say!) In Port St Mary (just a couple of minutes down the road from Port Erin) we have a good Indian restaurant. And the Harbour Lights restaurant is well known for its dishes making the best of local fish and produce.

Bird Watching 2As might be expected coastal species abound and the sight of gulls lazily enjoying the thermals or bravely encountering a strong easterly is common from our elevated position. The Calf of Man is famous for its bird population.
The steam train from Port Erin to Douglas dates from 1874 and is still maintained locally. The three foot track guage lines are now the longest run in the British Isles of their type. The Isle of Man was once part of the Bishopric of Sodor and Mann – dating back to the old Norwegian kingdom of which the island was once a part. Some say that it is no coincidence that Thomas the Tank Engine resided in the island of Sodor.
Both sea and freshwater fishing is still a popular pastime, and indeed a livlihood for many Manx families as it has been for centuries. Sea fishing trips are easily arranged depending on the time of year and weather.
Ancient monuments

DARK SKIES

Great Views of the night sky

The UK Campaign for Dark Skies carried out an analysis of the best places in the British Isles for stargazing, factoring in both light pollution and cloud cover. Whilst cloud cover is an issue throughout the British Isles, the clarity of the sky and the almost total lack of light pollution make the Island unique.

On a clear night the night sky of the Isle of Man is simply stunning when many astronomical sights can be seen through the naked eye and even more can be discovered through a telescope or binoculars.

(Info from Visit Isle of Man)